Mileposts: Holly Sugar (MP 73.5)

It’s perhaps the most visible landmark across the flatlands of western San Joaquin County – a cluster of tall, white silos bearing the Holly Sugar brand – which can be seen from miles away, towering above the landscape north of Tracy.

Here’s a preview of our upcoming article on the Holly Sugar refinery in Tracy and how it was served by rail and barge.

Holly Sugar Silos, Tracy, Calif. (Photo)

A General Electric 25-ton switcher snoozes beneath the silos at Holly Sugar’s Tracy plant.

Holly Sugar (Sugar Cut, Tracy CA, Circa 1930s Photo)

Prior to the extension of the “Sugar Spur,” beets were transported to the sugar mill via barge via Sugar Cut, a man-made inlet dug from Tom Paine Slough to the refinery.

Holly Sugar Refinery (1930s Photo)

The sugar refinery at Tracy, circa 1930s.

Southern Pacific Beet Train (Photo)

A train loaded with sugar beets arrives in the Southern Pacific’s yard on the west side of Tracy, having just traversed the Altamont Pass on its way into the Central Valley

Holly Sugar (Tracy) SPINS Map

A 1973 Southern Pacific “SPINS” map – a handy “aid to navigation” for train crews – showing the track schematic at the Holly Sugar plant.
(Click to enlarge)

Holly Sugar Spur (March 2008 Photo)

Switch 7470 on the Sugar Spur, just inside the gate (March 2008 Photo)

 

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Union Pacific “Mothball Fleet” In Tracy

A recent downturn in railroad revenues has turned the once-busy Union Pacific Railroad yard in Tracy into a pasture of sorts.

The UP’s yard here, which extends east from the Eleventh Street overpass downtown nearly to the town of Banta, has become the “rest home” for about 85 of the railroad’s locomotives that have been put out to pasture, stored here in hopes of a future rebound in freight shipments via rail.

The yard was constructed by the Southern Pacific and opened in the early 1960s, replacing the original SP yard downtown. Now Union Pacific property, the yard has been significantly less busy over the past two decades.

UP Stored Locomotives at Tracy (Photo)

The “mothball fleet,” which had previously been stored at the UP’s Stockton yard, comprises an impressive single-file line of engines in the railroad’s signature Armour Yellow paint visible at the stub end of Chrisman Road behind the various warehouses a few blocks off of Grant Line Road. Though partially obscured by parked freight cars, the locomotives can also be seen along Brichetto Road near Banta Road.

By most estimates, the stored units are not run of the mill outmoded “antiques” awaiting the scrapper’s torch. Many of the SD60M engines spotted in the yard date from around 1990, while the SD70M units in storage here were delivered to the Union Pacific in the early 2000s, according to a roster published by Trains magazine.

The locomotives arrived over the final weeks of August in a couple of moves from Stockton and will be held here indefinitely, pending an upturn in the railroad-related economy.

UP Stored Locomotives at Tracy (Photo)

We have also heard from various sources that the Union Pacific will no longer have locomotives assigned to active duty at the railroad’s Tracy yard office at the end of Sixth Street near MacArthur. Any freight moves in Tracy will reportedly be dispatched out of Stockton or Roseville.

(The California Northern Railroad, which leases the UP’s Westside Line down the San Joaquin Valley south from Tracy – its tracks mostly follow alongside Highway 33 – continues to park a locomotive tandem adjacent to the UP yard office for its weekday runs to their produce and agrichemical customers up and down the Valley.)

UP Stored Locomotives at Tracy (Photo)

Stored Union Pacific locomotives in the east end of the Tracy yard, near Banta and Brichetto Roads, on August 27, 2019

 

– Photos and text by David Jackson.

Railroad Crossing Sign (Image)

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Mileposts: Bethany (MP 75.7)

The village of Bethany could, once upon a time, be found along the Southern Pacific Railroad’s Martinez-to-Tracy extension, just a few miles outside the latter city’s limits.

These days, few signs remain of Bethany: an old farm road that ends near the tracks is perhaps the most significant remnant. (A reservoir in the nearby Livermore Hills is named for the town, but is several miles distant.)

The Central Pacific Railroad built a depot at Bethany around 1878 along the extension, which was constructed as the San Pablo & Tulare Railroad; in the early Twentieth Century, this section of tracks appeared on USGS maps – including the one below from 1914 – as the Southern Pacific’s “San Francisco and New Orleans Line.”

Today, it is known to railheads as the “Mococo Line.” It was the construction of this extension that led directly to the birth of Tracy at the end of the 1870s.

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Alameda & San Joaquin Railroad

(This article is a perpetual work in progress.)

If you’ve taken a load of trash to the dumps here in Tracy, you can’t avoid the solid bump of crossing what appears to be an abandoned set of railroad tracks protected by mute crossbuck warning signs a hundred or so feet down MacArthur Drive south of Linne Road.

The tracks are seldom used but are not entirely abandoned these days. Occasionally — very occasionally — the Union Pacific will spot a couple of freight cars loaded with steel coils there, alongside the Calaveras Materials rock grinders and the Teichert Aggregates entry gate on MacArthur.

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“Days Of First Railroad”

When visiting the Tracy Historical Museum, if you only see what is directly in front of you, you may miss something magnificent farther above eye level.

Among those “somethings” is a rare and wonderful mural by the Oakland-born artist Edith Hamlin (1902–1992), whose other works included murals at Coit Tower and Mission High School in San Francisco, and at the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C.

Muralist Edith Hamlin (Photo)

Edith Hamlin at work on the Mission High School mural, circa 1936.

Shortly after the United States Post Office opened at the corner of 12th and Adam streets here in 1937, Miss Hamlin painted a series of three murals depicting Tracy’s early history.

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Eastbound OAMJM At Tracy, 1981

Fresh into our yardmaster’s office today is this big win off of eBay, showing Southern Pacific Railroad SD-9 4426 and partner(s?) leading a string of cars under the old Eleventh Street overpass in 1981, headed out of town toward Banta and Mossdale.

This view can no longer be replicated for several reasons, not the least of which is the tear-down and rebuild of the old overpass.

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Southern Pacific Railway Yards, Tracy

The backside of this picture postcard has “Monday, Oct 25, 1948” penciled in script, so we’re guessing that this view of the Southern Pacific Railroad’s yard is from the mid to late 1940s.

The caption under the photo on the postcard reads “Southern Pacific Railway Yards and Shops, Tracy, California.”

If you’re looking at this photograph today, imagine yourself on the roof of the Tracy Transit Center, facing toward the new-fangled overpass that recently opened, taking 11th Street over the Union Pacific tracks.

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Jack Godwin, Carbona Station Agent

Jack Godwin served as station agent at the Western Pacific Railroad’s Carbona depot from 1954 until his death in 1974. Ten years after he arrived, wife and children in tow, the WP renamed the stop “Tracy” on their timetables, as well as on the station’s roof-top nameboard.

The Ted Benson photo featured above shows Jack in a classic railroader’s pose, fingers on the telegrapher’s key, carrying on a conversation with his colleagues down the line in well-timed dots and dashes.

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The San Joaquin Daylight

Showing here (above) is a portion of the schedule for the San Joaquin Daylight for the segment during which it traversed the so-called “Mococo Line” (from MOuntain COpper COmpany) from Martinez to Tracy and back again, excerpted from the Southern Pacific’s official Timetable #10, issued on May 12, 1968.

San Joaquin Daylight (Photo)

A Southern Pacific promo shot of the steam-powered San Joaquin Daylight near Bakersfield in the 1940s

Following the SP’s practice of designating “east” and “west” on its timetables based on the location of its Market Street corporate headquarters in San Francisco, the “eastward” San Joaquin Daylight (Train 52, originating in Oakland) is actually heading south to Los Angeles, while the “westward” return trip (Train 51, originating in L.A.) is heading north to Oakland.

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The Southern Pacific Employees Clubhouse

Here’s a tinted picture postcard of the Southern Pacific Railroad’s “Employee Club,” located for many years along an extension of C Street in the downtown Tracy railyard.

SP Clubhouse Sign

The sign above the Club’s front door…

The clubhouse served as a rest stop for SP train crews between trips — a place to grab forty winks, a bite to eat, or shoot some pool (or some bull) before hitting the high iron again.

The club lacked air conditioning in the early portion of the 20th Century, so a screened-in “porch” upstairs allowed off-duty workers to sleep beneath the stars and escape the oppressive heat of summertime evenings in the San Joaquin Valley.

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